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Adult Book Blog - Staff book reviews, fiction and non-fiction.

The Edge: A blog about Occult philosophy, depth psychology, ancient times, future times and the frontiers of science.

Farnsworth's blog features news and reviews in the world of sci-fi.

Internet Search and Web Tools and ebook technologies - brought to you by mrweaver.

It's a Mystery is a blog about the Mystery genre and its many subgenres.

Just the Facts - In Reference, we learn something new every day. What we find, we share with you.

The Media Maven's goal is to help you understand what resources and databases the library has access to, how to use them, and sometimes give reviews to books she thinks you might enjoy.

Music Musings on Monday features music news, releases, and everyday musings.

The Playful Parent - Make the most of your family time with ideas for activities and crafts that entertain and educate!

The Sports Section covers the world of sports, from alpine skiing to yachting.

Science as Entertainment

The Canon:  A whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science

Natalie Angier

Ms. Angier is a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer for the New York Times.  She combines a passion for science with an understanding of how it works and then writes about it with wit and intelligence.  This is a book for any parent who has been asked what is electricity or how was the earth made.  It is also for anyone wanting to understand many of the issues facing us today--from stem cells to bird flu and global warming.  All the major scientific disciplines are brought to light:  physics, chemistry, biology, geology and astronomy in a book that will inspire and recapture each reader's childhood fascination with the world around us.

Three Cheers for Laurie R. King!

Touchstone
by Laurie R. King
A great stand alone title from the author of the Mary Russell mysteries, this novel is set in post World War I England. It follows the efforts of an American agent hunting down a terrorist who has ties to bombings in the United States. In order to get close to his suspect, Harris Stuyvesant befriends a wounded British soldier who left the war with incredible extrasensory abilities after nearly getting killed in the trenches.

Summer Drama

Body Surfing
by Anita Shreve
Sydney takes a summer job with a wealthy New Hampshire family tutoring their young daughter Julie while they vacation at their beach cottage. During her stay, Sidney finds herself enmeshed in family jealousies and secrets eventually reawakening rivalries between two older brothers who visit the cottage periodically.

Where Are You Now?

Carolyn MacKenzie was 16 years old when her older brother Charles, known as Mack, disappeared just before his college graduation. A decade later, dissatisfied with the police’s efforts to find Mack, Carolyn decides to undertake her own investigation. Clinging to the belief that Mack is alive, based on his annual calls to their mother on Mother’s Day, Carolyn begins to interview anyone she can find who had a connection with her brother. The more she learns, the more questions arise, and the more she unknowingly jeopardizes her own safety. Where Are You Now?, Mary Higgins Clark’s twenty-seventh suspense novel, incorporates all the elements Higgins Clark fans have come to expect: numerous characters who are rarely whom they appear to be, fast-paced chapters with cliffhanger endings, and plot twists that’ll keep the reader guessing.

Mars landing May 25

Image: Artist's depiction of Phoenix lander arriving on Mars. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Calech/University of Arizona We're landing on Mars this Sunday. Well, at least a mechanical emissary of ours is landing on the Red Planet this Sunday, May 25.

Web Resource on Nutrition and Aging

The National Institutes of Health has recently published a Web-based resource on nutrition and aging as part of NIHSeniorHealth.gov, its Web portal for health issues for seniors. This site is an excellent resource.

Sunshine on a Rainy Morning

History shows that Hitler made a mistake invading Russia in World War II. What many people do not know is that the need for an alternative source of cooking oil for Germany and the Soviet sunflower fields were a contributing factor to his decision. In his book Sunflowers (the Secret History), Joe Pappalardo relates the unexpected history of this flower from caves in the Stone Age to the gardens of kings. Flower lovers, scientists, and trivia buffs will find this book entertaining reading as they learn of sunflowers influence on our lives.

It's a Mystery

Mystery News

 

Two organizations just presented their 2008 awards for mysteries written in 2007.

Agatha Award - given by Malice Domestic, Ltd., in honor of Agatha Christie.  The Best Novel award went to Fatal Grace by Louise Penny (shelved in Mystery).

Desperate Housewives

What do you do with yourself when you’ve elected to step off a promising career path to raise a family and then find that 10 years have passed and your kids no longer need you like they once did? Meg Wolitzer examines this question through the lives of four women in her latest novel, The Ten-Year Nap. Long-time friends Amy, Jill, Roberta, and Karen struggle to find meaning and purpose in their lives as they experience marital ennui, their husbands' professional successes, their pre-teen children's move toward independence, and their friendship tested when Amy befriends a woman she and her three friends have always simultaneously mocked and admired. Well written, poignant, and often unnervingly realistic, The Ten-Year Nap explores the roles of contemporary women as daughters, mothers, and wives.

Luna in the sky with diamonds

Saturday, May 10: Celebrate Astronomy Day by taking a look at the night sky. After dark, say around 9:30 to 10:00, under --we hope-- a clear sky, look in the direction of the first-quarter Moon. To the lower right of our pock-marked neighbor you will see three bright "stars" floating in the still darkening sky. The first of those isn't a star at all. That first reddish object is the planet Mars. To the right of that are two of the genuine article: stars Pollux and Castor, the "head" parts of the constellation Gemini. Higher in the sky, nearly overhead, the ringed planet Saturn can be seen to the east of the star Regulus; the pairing makes them easy to spot. Look carefully: can you see the slightly golden tint to Saturn's light compared with the star's cooler color?