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Adult Book Blog Staff book reviews, fiction and non-fiction.

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Farnsworth's blog features news and reviews in the world of sci-fi.

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It's a Mystery is a blog about the Mystery genre and its many subgenres.

Just the Facts. In Reference, we learn something new every day. What we find, we share with you.

Local History narrated by librarian Zac Springer

The Media Maven's goal is to help you understand what resources and databases the library has access to, how to use them, and sometimes give reviews to books she thinks you might enjoy.

Music Musings on Monday features music news, releases, and everyday musings..

The Playful Parent - Make the most of your family time with ideas for activities and crafts that entertain and educate!

The Sports Section covers the world of sports, from alpine skiing to yachting.

Legendary Scottish History!

Lady Macbeth by Susan King
Lady Gruadh is the last heir in a royal Celtic family whose unwilling marriage to Macbeth, a warrior lord who killed her husband, will unite Scotland for the first time. Together they survive treacherous and violent politics to save the country they were both born to rule. A rich and dramatic historical novel!

Chore Wars!

If chores are a constant battle in your family, then there is a Website for you: ChoreWars.com.

Basically, your household's chore workload is transformed into an online role-playing game, like the ones your kids are already playing.

The family determines what the chores are, and how many "experience points" each one is worth, making a nice little competitive incentive between the players. So, a little healthy sibling rivalry could give you a much cleaner house!

A Year's Worth of French Cooking

Facing 30 and feeling that she didn't have much to show for it except an unrewarding secretarial job, Julie Powell decided she needed a project, something that would motivate, challenge, excite, and satisfy her. She found it in Julia Child's classic cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking. With support from her husband, friends, and eventually her family, Powell gave herself a year to make every recipe in the cookbook. What began as a simple daily blog resulted in Julie & Julia: 365 days, 524 recipes, 1 tiny apartment kitchen. How Powell accomplished her goal and what she learned will inspire, amaze, and amuse even those with the most basic cooking skills. 

What Really Happens at Your Local Library

You'll view the public library in a whole new light after you read Free for All: Oddballs, Geeks, and Gangstas in the Public Library by Don Borchert. This memoir of an assistant librarian at a California library reveals, among other things, that sex offenders, drug dealers, and gang members are just as likely to roam the stacks as preschoolers, students, and senior citizens; that books are not the only items put in the book drops; and that even seemingly cheery, mild-mannered librarians have a breaking point. Often laugh-out-loud funny, occasionally poignant, and always entertaining, this book features a library that is a microcosm of public libraries around the nation.

It's a Mystery 4/14/08

Mystery Readers' Resources

Where can a mystery reader go to find answers to questions, such as "What title is next in the Maisie Dobbs mystery series?  Who writes the mysteries featuring the character Jack Daniels?  Does my favorite author have a new mystery coming out soon?  What authors write police procedurals?"

There are a number of print and online resources that can answer these questions, as well as many others about the mystery genre.  One of my favorites is Stop, You're Killing Me!   (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com)  This website provides a wealth of information about mysteries, authors, series, and read-alikes.  The main search is by author or character and provides a link to the author's website (if available), a brief description of the series the author writes, and then lists the titles in chronological order.  There are also great links on the left side of the page - mysteries by location, occupation, historical time period, genres, read-alikes, etc.

An Exciting Equine Mystery

Dead Heat by Dick Francis Max Morton is a well-respected chef whose career is nearly ruined after a food poisoning incident and a bomb blast occur at two of his catering affairs. To salvage his restaurant business he sets out to discover who is behind these crimes that are somehow connected to the world of horseracing. He will need to protect himself and his loved ones before the truth is uncovered. A highly enjoyable read!

It's a Mystery 4/1/08

What Exactly is a Mystery?

The meanings of the terms Mystery, Suspense, and Thriller are often used interchangeably, but can also be confusing.  A helpful explanation comes from the Cluelass website:  http://cluelass.com.

    "There are no hard-and-fast rules, but Mystery and detective fiction emphasizes the puzzle aspect of the plot, with clues and "fair play" for the reader - i.e. the readers should be able to determine the solution at the same time as the protagonist.

Sites for Baby Boomers

PC Magazine has a great list, "Top 10 Sites for Baby Boomers".

There are sites focused on retirement, finding post-retirement employment, and aging; blogs: "boomergirl" and "I Remember JFK"; and online communities for boomers.

It's a Mystery

A Brief History of the Mystery

Welcome to the first posting of It's a Mystery.  For those of you who share an interest in reading mysteries, I hope to bring you information about the mystery genre, including trends, author information, news about forthcoming books and lots more.

A brief history of the mystery takes us back to ancient times when playwrights Sophocles and Euripides wove mysteries into their dramas.  But the man known as the "father of the mystery story" is Edgar Allan Poe, who introduced the first fiction detective, Auguste C. Dupin, in The Murders in the Rue Morgue in 1841.  Other writers who influenced Poe and the early mystery genre were Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins.  The Leavenworth Case, penned by Anna Katherine Green in 1878, is the first mystery story written by a woman.

Arthur C Clarke, science fiction legend, dies at 90

SF legend Arthur C. Clarke has died in Sri Lanka at the age of 90.

 

Clarke was a visionary--credited with the idea of communications satellites--and deep sea explorer, but he recently said he would like to be remembered most as a Science Fiction writer.

 

To read the Associated Press obituary, click here.